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A Boy Named Isamu

ebook
Awarded an Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature Picture Book Honor, this stunning picture book brings to life the imagination of Japanese American artist, Isamu Noguchi.
(Cover image may vary.)
If you are Isamu, stones are the most special of all.
How can they be so heavy?
Would they float if they had no weight?
Winner of the Theordor Seuss Geisel Award in 2020 for Stop! Bot!, James Yang imagines a day in the boyhood of Japanese American artist, Isamu Noguchi. Wandering through an outdoor market, through the forest, and then by the ocean, Isamu sees things through the eyes of a young artist . . .but also in a way that many children will relate. Stones look like birds. And birds look like stones.
Through colorful artwork and exquisite text, Yang translates the essence of Noguchi so that we can all begin to see as an artist sees.

Expand title description text
Publisher: Penguin Young Readers Group

Kindle Book

  • Release date: June 15, 2021

OverDrive Read

  • ISBN: 9780593203453
  • Release date: June 15, 2021

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Formats

Kindle Book
OverDrive Read
Kindle restrictions

Languages

English

Levels

ATOS Level:2.5
Lexile® Measure:500
Interest Level:K-3(LG)
Text Difficulty:0-2

Awarded an Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature Picture Book Honor, this stunning picture book brings to life the imagination of Japanese American artist, Isamu Noguchi.
(Cover image may vary.)
If you are Isamu, stones are the most special of all.
How can they be so heavy?
Would they float if they had no weight?
Winner of the Theordor Seuss Geisel Award in 2020 for Stop! Bot!, James Yang imagines a day in the boyhood of Japanese American artist, Isamu Noguchi. Wandering through an outdoor market, through the forest, and then by the ocean, Isamu sees things through the eyes of a young artist . . .but also in a way that many children will relate. Stones look like birds. And birds look like stones.
Through colorful artwork and exquisite text, Yang translates the essence of Noguchi so that we can all begin to see as an artist sees.

Expand title description text
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